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page 2
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San Marziale
Sant’Alvise
Santa Caterina
Santa Fosca
Santa Maria dei Redentore Chiesa delle Cappuccine
Santa Maria dei Servi
Volto Santo
Santa Maria delle Penitenti
Santa Maria Maddalena
La Maddalena
Santa Maria Valverde
Misericordia
Santa Sofia
Santi Apostoli
Scalzi
Santa Maria de Nazaret

non-catholic
Scuola dell'Angelo Custode (Evangelical Lutheran)


 

San Marziale
1693-1714

 

 











 


History

Tradition tells us that this church was founded in the 9th Century and dedicated to San Marcilliano, who Venetian dialect transforms into San Marziale. A statue of the Virgin and child that was carved by a shepherd called Rustico in Rimini (with the help of angels) came here 'miraculously' unaccompanied on a boat in 1286. This led to a rebuilding, by the Bocchi family, and a reconsecration in 1333. The present church dates from another rebuilding of 1693-1714 which was reconsecrated in 1721. In memory of the great victories gained on San Marziale's day the Doge used to process here every 1st of July.

The church
The exterior is whitewashed and very plain. The interior is more decorated, with ceiling paintings by Sebastiano Ricci depicting St Martial in Glory and the creation and arrival of the miraculous statue of the Virgin mentioned above. The luminosity of these paintings pre-dates Tiepolo and his re-introduction of the shadowless glow into Venetian art. There are six side altars. Four of them feature barley-sugar spiral columns and the two central ones on each side are even more sticky-outy and architectural with some very precarious putti. A copy of the famous and miraculous statue of the Virgin is to be found in a niche on the altar dedicated to the Beata Vergine delle Grazie. The sculpture over the high altar is by Fra Giuseppe Pozzo, who also had a hand in the high altar of the Gesuiti.  The work is again exuberant: highly populated and surging up, in this case, to a gold globe. The organ is behind it.

Art highlights
Tintoretto's St Martial in Glory (see right) over the second altar on the right was originally painted for the high altar but was moved during the 17th Century rebuilding. It was the artist's first commissioned altarpiece and he was paid 50 ducats for it.
Presumably it being early is what explains it being not very Tintorettoish.

Lost art
Tobias and the angel
by Titian, once this church's famous great treasure, has been moved to the Madonna dell’Orto.

Opening times
Monday to Saturday 4.00 to 6.30pm
Sunday 8.30 to 10.00am

Vaporetto
San Marcuola

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Sant’Alvise
14th-15th Centuries
 


History
The convent and church of Sant’Alvise was built in 1388 at the behest of doge’s daughter Antonia Venier. Saint Louis, Bishop of Toulouse (Alvise is the transformation (via Luigi) of Louis into Venetian dialect) had appeared to her in a dream and told her to build a church in his honour, and he even told her where to build it. She then withdrew to the convent herself, with a group of fellow followers of the teachings of St Augustine, all women from noble Venetian families. The original wooden structures were rebuilt in 1430, due in no small part to the generosity of Pope Martin V, and restored at the end of the 17th Century. In 1807 nuns from nearby Santa Caterina moved here. Following suppression in 1810 the convent became a home for abandoned girls and the church became a parish church. Nuns returned later in the 19th Century, transferring this time from Santa Lucia.
 
The church
The exterior is in a plain and lofty flat gothic style. The 15th Century statue of St Louis over the door is by Florentine Agostino di Duccio.
 
Interior
The barco (nuns’ choir) at the back of the church dates from the 15th Century, although the wrought-iron grill is an 18th Century addition. The nuns entered this raised gallery from the convent next door and remained unseen behind the grill for the service. A similar grill low in the right-hand wall allowed them to come down and take the sacrament. The decoration of the rest of the single-nave church dates from the 17th Century - most overwhelming, and
a bit incongruous, are the vertiginous trompe l'oeil ceiling frescos by Antonio Torri and Pietro Ricchi. Ruskin hated these works, blaming Veronese for inspiring such later and lesser artists with his superior ceilings.
 
Art highlights
Worth the trek out here are the three Tiepolos depicting Christ’s passion. Two are early and less impressive (The Flagellation and The Crowning With Thorns) but the dramatic Ascent to Calvary looks like it might have been inspired by Tintoretto, who is not himself represented here, oddly, given his ubiquity in Venetian churchs, especially in Cannaregio, his home district. The church acquired three important relics of Christ's suffering in 1456, the Chorus laminated guide sheet tells us, and thereby acquired a related reputation and devotees, hence the theme of these commissioned Tiepolos.
 
Eight small 15th-century tempera panels showing scenes from the Old Testament on the back wall are of varying quality. These were called ‘baby Carpaccios’ by Ruskin, which has been interpreted as a contention that they were by Carpaccio when he was a boy, although he would've been 8! They were actually painted by the studio of Lazzaro Bastiani, with whom Carpaccio was a student, and taken from the organ case of the suppressed church of Santa Maria delle Vergini.

Campanile 26m (85 ft) electromechanical bells
14th Century brickwork, it had a pine-cone spire and four little towers but in the 17th Century this was replaced by an octagonal drum. Restored during work in 1910 to its original appearance.


Opening times
Monday to Saturday: 10.00 to 5.00
Sundays: closed
A Chorus Church

The Convent

Still a working convent, housing 23 white-clad nuns of the Canossian order from Santa Lucia, they now have their own chapel so don’t need to use the barco and they now let out their numerous empty cells to female students. I’m told that if you're dressed appropriately you can visit the cloisters and gardens. You just have to knock on the door of the nursery, adjacent to the façade of the church, on weekday mornings, and ask nicely.

Vaporetto
Sant’Alvise

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Image above from Google maps
 

Santa Caterina
mid-15th Century
 


























The painting below right used to be hung over the high altar above.




 

 
History

The original church and monastery was founded in the 11th Century by the order of The Friars of the Penitence of Jesus Christ, who were also called the Sacchini friars because of their sackcloth robes. Following the suppression of the order in 1274 the complex passed to Augustinian nuns around 1289. Rebuilt in the mid-15th Century, the church and convent were suppressed in 1807, becoming a school, the nuns moving to Sant’Alvise. Damaged during World War 1 and by a large fire on Christmas Day in 1977. The latter destroyed the roof, which was rebuilt.

Interior
Two aisles, with a ship's-keel roof and a large nuns' gallery (both visible in photo far below left).
The church is now used by the school purely as a space, and a space with three big portakabin classrooms erected in the middle. The church fittings are in a very poor state. Two side altars remain, one on each side, and the high altar in its charred-looking apse. No art remains. There are bits of painted wood partitioning and modern doors to further make for a functional but unlovely space.

Lost art
The slightly flirty blushing Madonna del Parto (see right) by the Master of the Madonna del Parto, from the late 14th Century, is in the Accademia, in the room converted from the Carita church, in the chapel-like space to the left of the apse.

Also in the Accademia is Titian's Tobias and the Archangel  thanks to it never having been returned here following its looting by Napoleon. It has the Bembo coat of arms behind the dog - the connection with Pietro Bembo, aside from his friendship with Titian, being that his nieces were educated here. This painting, which is a little flat-looking,  is now, however, sometimes attributed to 'a follower of Titian', possibly Santo Zago. 

Currently (2010) on display in the corridor at the Accademia are two Scenes from the Life of Santa Caterina painted for this church by Sebastiano Mazzoi

Also now in the Accademia is Veronese's fine Mystic Marriage of St Catherine (see right) which was painted for the high altar and taken from here in 1925. There was also a series of six paintings of Episodes in the Life of Saint Catherine which presumably fitted in the frame visible in the photo (above left) by Tintoretto and his studio, which were still here in the early 20th Century but are now in the Patriarchal Palace.


The convent on TV
The cloister appears repeatedly in Episode 9 Doctored Evidence of the German TV adaptation of Donna Leon's Brunetti novels.

Opening times

The complex now belongs to a school (the church houses portakabin schoolrooms) and so is not usually accessible.


Vaporetto
Fondamente Nuove

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The cloister in 1928.
 

Santa Fosca
1679 - 1733
 


History
Following the arrival of the body of Santa Fosca on the island of Torcello in the 10th century her local popularity grew and this church was built. Renovation followed in 1297 and a complete rebuilding in 1679, architect unknown. Reconsecration in 1733 was followed by the renovation of the façade by the Doná family, to a design possibly by Domenico Rossi. A plaque in the church commemorates the ceiling falling in after mass on the 24th June 1761, but no one was injured. More restoration work in 1847. The artist Bernardo Strozzi is buried here.

The Church
The handsome façade was added in 1733-1741, and paid for by the Donà family. The tympanum is topped by statues of the Risen Christ and two virtues.


The interior

Aisleless and stony-coloured with a pair of altars on either side and a pair flanking the chancel. No great art and plenty of patches of damp and crumble. Some of the paintings have hand-written tags. This is very much a working church, though, with more old ladies in black lighting candles than fluorescent visitors.

Art highlights
A Byzantine Pietà and a damaged Holy Family by Tintoretto's son Domenico.

Lost art
Saint Peter Martyr (now in the Correr Museum) is a panel from a lost polyptych by Carpaccio originally painted for this church but broken up during the Napoleonic Suppressions. Two more panels, St Roch and St Sebastian, are in the Bergamo Accademia Carrara and Zagreb Academy respectively.

Campanile 31m (101ft) manual bells
Erected 873 and rebuilt in 1297 . Rebuilt again in 1450 after falling down during a storm on
the 10th of August 1410. Topped by four gothic shrines and a lead-covered onion dome. Ruskin said it was: ...of late gothic uninjured by restorations and peculiarly Venetian in being crowned with a cupola, not the pyramid.


Opening times
Tuesday & Thursday 9.30-11.15

Vaporetto San Marcuola

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Santa Maria delle Penitenti
Giorgio Massari 1730-38
 






History
A hospice for repentant fallen women, founded at Santa Marina in 1703, transferred here in 1705, occupying buildings paid for by Maria Elisabetta Rossi and Marina da Lezze. The complex was designed by Massari with the church consecrated in 1763. It was based on Palladio's Le Zitelle on Giudecca, with the church façade flanked by blocks of accommodation. The complex is deep, with two cloisters, one behind the other.

The church has an unfinished façade from a design by Lazarri of 1845. The complex has been undergoing extensive renovation work and conversion in recent years. This now seems to be nearing completion, with a school opening in the hospice complex and hopes for some kind of permanent opening for the church later in 2014.

Interior
The Greek-cross plan makes for a tall and square space with white walls and pale grey stone detailing. On the side altars there is a Crucifix on the left and a painting of the Madonna in Glory on the right. The high altarpiece in the shallow apse shows The Ascension. The ceiling of the apse has a small oval painting, with a larger one in the roof of the church. At least three of these paintings, including the main altarpiece, are by
Jacopo Marieschi, the son of the vedute painter Michele.


Opening times Soon!

Vaporetto
Tre Archi

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The back end of the complex before the recent work.
 

Santa Maria dei Redentore
1614-23
 


History

Capuchin nuns were allowed to settle here in 1612. A church was built, with work begun when Cardinal Francesco Vendramin laid the first stone on August 17th, 1614, and consecration on the 1st of October 1623 by patriarch Giovanni Tiepolo. The consecration is commemorated by a tablet inside the church over the door. A convent was built behind the church.  The complex was suppressed in 1818, but the nuns returned a few years later and remained until 1911. The original convent buildings, which stretched as far as the lagoon, seem to have been demolished around this time, to be replaced by the current buildings, which now house a school.

The church
The figures of the Virgin and Child over the door the work of Gerolamo Campagna, a pupil of Sansovino. On the right hand exterior wall is the coat of arms of the Franciscan order.

Interior
A plain, small and aisleless space with a pair of side altars and, over the high altar, a painting of The Virgin with Saints Francis, Clare, Mark and Ursula by Palma Giovane. The framing on the ceiling would have housed the lost Palma canvases mentioned below. The painting over the right hand altar is The Death of Saint Joseph by an unknown artist of  'the Paduan school' from the 17th Century. Over the opposite altar is an antique copy of an icon. On the floor are six tombstones, none identifiable.

Lost art
In 1614, whilst the church was being built, Marietta Foscarini donated three paintings by Palma Giovane to go on the ceiling. They are now lost.

Vaporetto
Ponte dei Tre Archi

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A photo from 1925.
 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





 







 

 













 

Santa Maria dei Servi
Cappella dei Lucchesi
 



Photo above by J@M




Photo above by Brigitte Eckert


History

A monastery of the Servite Order was founded here in 1318 and work on the church began in 1330, but the work was not completed until 1474, with consecration in 1491. Reports state that it was demolished again in 1510 and rebuilt at the expense of the Servite friars. The church was conceived to compete with San Zanipolo and the Frari in size, as can be seen in the etching of 1703 (see below left). It covered almost eleven thousand square meters including, besides the church itself, the Cappella dei Lucchesi, three dormitories and a refectory, as well as cloisters and  orchards. Frà Paolo Sarpi, a Servite monk who later became a famed theologian, scholar, anti-papal patriot and friend of Galileo, lived and studied here. His statue is to be found in front of the nearby church of Santa Fosca. On the bridge near that church he was attacked by five Papally-employed ruffians on October 5th 1607 as he returned to the Servi. They left him for dead but he recovered from his wounds, which included a dagger in his face.

There was a serious fire in 1769 which destroyed most of the monastery buildings. The church and monastery were suppressed in 1812 and almost totally demolished. By 1821 nothing was left but the Cappella dei Lucchesi (built in 1360 at the edge of the site while building was progressing and consecrated in 1376) and two portals, including the 15th century Gothic entrance (see photos below left).

The site was bought by Canon Daniele Canale who, along with Anna Maria Marovich, in 1864 founded a charitable institution for women just released from prison called the Istituto Canal Marovich ai Servi. The Cappella dei Lucchesi (see photo left) was rebuilt as the chapel for the institute, having fallen into use as a warehouse. In the early 20th century the institute's scope broadened to include schooling for young girls of 6-11 years and 11-15 years. Generally these girls were orphans, which during and after WW2 also included girls who'd lost their fathers.
The school closed in the late 1960s and the complex is now a student hostel. There have been recent rumours that the Cappella dei Lucchesi is due to be restored and opened for some sort of public use.

Lost art
A statue of Adam by Tullio Lombardo was carved around 1490 for the tomb of Doge Andrea Vendramin in the old church. It was moved to San Zanipolo initially, with the Doge's tomb, but is now in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. It suffered a catastrophic accident in 2002 but has been restored, this having taken somewhat longer than the two years initially promised. It was recently announced that it would go back on display in November 2015. More here. The church also contained the tombs of Doge Francesco Donà (now at Meren near Conegliano) and Admiral Angelo Emo (now in San Biagio).

A 14th Century relief of the Madonna della Misericordia, now over the door of the Scuola dei Calegheri e Zavatteri opposite the church of San Tomà, came from this church.

The Lamentation  by Giovanni Bellini (or, it has been argued, by Rocco Marconi, one of his pupils) which is now in the Accademia was originally over the first altar on the right in Santa Maria dei Servi, possibly installed after the 1510 rebuilding. Also in the Accademia is Benedetto Diana's Virgin and Child with Saints John, Louis and Monica which was originally on the altar of the Sacristy here.

Veronese's Supper in the House of the Pharisee (now in the Château de Versailles) was painted for the refectory here.

The Correr Museum has two large worn wooden doors from here.

Ruskin said
Only two of its gates and some ruined walls are left, in one of the foulest districts of the city. It was one of the most interesting monuments of the early fourteenth century Gothic; and there is much beauty in the fragments yet remaining. How long they may stand I know not, the whole building having been offered me for sale, ground and all, or stone by stone, as I chose, by its present proprietor, when I was last in Venice. More real good might at present be effected by any wealthy person who would devote his resources to the preservation of such monuments wherever they exist, by freehold purchase of the entire ruin, and afterwards by taking proper charge of it, and forming a garden round it, than by any other mode of protecting or encouraging art. There is no school, no lecturer, like a ruin of the early ages.

Opening times

The Cappella dei Lucchesi: 9.00 to 12.15, 4.30 to 6.15 supposedly, but there's never been any evidence of any such opening when I've been there.

 

Vaporetto San Marcuola

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Santa Maria Maddalena
Tommaso Temanza/Giannantonio Selva  1760-89
 


History
The first church here was built in 1220 by the Baffo family on the site of their fortified house. It was demolished and replaced by the present church in the 1760s, to a neoclassical design by Tommaso Temanza who died in 1789 and was buried in the church. Temanza was better known as a theorist and historian and this is one of his few completed buildings. The work was finished by Giannantonio Selva, who went on to design the Fenice opera house. Closed in 1810 and later reopened as an oratory. The church was recently restored and has since been used to house occasional Biennale exhibits.

The church
Modelled on the Pantheon, circular on the outside with the circularity emphasised by the flattening of the temple front. A 'compact' hexagonal interior with four chapels.

Art
Some 18th Century works, including a Last Supper by Giandomenico Tiepolo.


Local colour
The nearby Rio Terra della Maddalena was probably the first canal to be filled in. As late as the 18th Century it was just know as the Rio Terra with no name to distinguish it.

Opening times
Very rare. Sometimes houses art exhibitions.

Vaporetto San Marcuola

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The two interior photos are
by Brigitte Eckert

Santa Maria Valverde
13th Century/Clemente Moli 1651-59








Photo by Michelle Lovric.




















 


History
Built as an abbey church in 936, it was originally named Santa Maria di Val Verde from the original name of the isolated island on which it was built. In 1348 all the monks died of the plague with only the abbot surviving. He died in 1369 and patronage of the church passed to the Moro family. The church was enlarged in the 13th Century, by which time Cannaregio had grown to engulf it. In 1651-59 the façade, by Bolognese architect Clemente Molli, was added during further rebuilding. This work was financed by philosopher Gasparo Moro, whose bust by Molli is above the door (see left). Molli also carved the allegorical figures either side of the door and the Virgin up on the segmental pediment.

On 9th June 1611 Girolamo Savina, then the prior of the abbey, and the author of a famous chronicle called the Cronaca Savina, was murdered whilst saying mass, by a monk who had poisoned the communion wine. Before dying Savina forgave his poisoner and obtained a pardon for him.

The convent was in such a sorry and collapsed state it was demolished in the early 19th Century. The church escaped suppression in the Napoleonic period, but was in a poor state when it was taken in hand by Abbot Pietro Pianton who, from 1828-1864, managed to find and reinstate some of its original fittings, as well as fittings from other suppressed churches, and so restored the church's fortunes. Patriarch Domenico Agostini bought the building in 1844, so saving it from becoming an Evangelical church. Pianton's work was unfortunately reversed after his death in 1864. After legal proceedings the Mor-Lin family reacquired the church and dispersed the art works that weren't originally to be found there. The church had closed in 1868, but it did re-open, badly restored and without its original fittings, in the early part of the 20th Century. The last mass was celebrated here on 17th August 1967, two years before the remaining Servite monks left and the complex was closed.

The church has had restoration work done on it lately though, at least on the exterior, as can be seen by comparing the screen capture from the James Bond film Moonraker, released in 1979 (see below) with the newly-pink exterior and cleaned stonework as seen in the recent photograph (further below left).

The old Scuola
To the left is the old Scuola della Misericordia which was built for the confraternity of the Misericordia, which was founded in 1261, with rebuilding in the first half of the 15th Century by the Bon family. It had a Gothic arch with a large miracle-working relief of the Madonna della Misericordia attributed to Bartolomeo Bon. The arch was demolished in 1612, and the relief (see left) is now in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, along with other sculptures from the scuola. In 1583 the Confraternity moved to the new Scuola, the huge and unfinished Gothic barn-like building by Sansovino just to the left at the other end of the bridge in the photo (below). The old scuola became a hospice and, in 1643, the guildhall of the silk-cloth weavers' guild. It was later used as a theatre. Now it's used as an art restoration centre, for both sculpture and paintings. This video shows the large Titian from the Sala dell'Albergo at the the Accademia being brought here for restoration in late 2010.

Lost art
Organ door paintings by Zelotti are now in the Museo Civico in Padua.

The church in art
Santa Maria della Misericordia by Mortimer Menpes (see below left). The Misericordia, Venice
by Edward Le Bas, painted c.1949, is in Rochdale.

Campanile 14m (46ft) manual bells
Sturdy and 13th Century it may have had a defensive function originally as it faces the lagoon.

Local plans
The first plans for a railway bridge linking Venice to the mainland, in 1830, had the Misericordia as the site of the terminal.

The church in fiction
The church is one of the important and recurring locations in Heather Redding's 2014 novel Stealing Venice. Fictional elements include the church being open and a Madonna and Child by Cima da Conegliano.

The church in film
Apart from appearing in Moonraker, Klaus Kinski in Nosferatu in Venice chases a blonde victim into the doorway here and one of the many funerals in the tacky Italian horror film Nero Veneziano happens here too, as does Summertime's showdown at the end. The addition of a side entrance to the right of the church's façade also allows Casanova access to the nuns of San Zaccaria in a film called Infanzia, vocazione e prime esperienze di Giacomo Casanova, Veneziano.


A passing speedboat has just chopped the snogging couple's gondola in half, you see.




Opening times

The church has been deconsecrated and empty for decades now - it is said to now be 'owned privately' - and that impromptu wooden door and the graffiti and smashed windows have been bad indicators for a fair few years. The impromptu interior photo (above left) was grabbed for this site in April 2009 by an intrepid correspondent just before she was chased away by builders. There are more dilapidated interior pics here - click on the 'Suite' link.

Update August 2009 Correspondent Francesco Boraldo has provided a photograph (above left) of the elegant cloister in the angle between the church and the old scuola. And of the campanile seen from this cloister (above).


Vaporetto Madonna dell'Orto

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Santa Sofia
Antonio Gaspari 17th Century
 


History
Tradition dates the founding of this church to 866, but the earliest written record is from 1020. There was a rebuilding in 1225, 1568 and 1698. The appearance of the current church mostly dates from a 17th Century restoration by Antonio Gaspari, although this church was burnt down on 28th February 1760, but was rebuilt.  Suppressed in 1810, the church was sold to the Jewish community, but reopened following its purchase by Giovan Battista Rebellini in 1836.

The church
The church's (unfinished) façade is hidden behind a house built for the priest Don Massiaglia in 1872. But the façade was already blocked in in 1500 (see below).

Interior
Compact, with pale walls and pale stone detailing.  Sparse decoration (see below right). The aisles are separated from the nave by tall four bays each side, with two side altars in each of  the aisles and small altars either side of the chancel. Somewhat unplain is the apse, which is decorated in a gently rococo way.

Art
Upon suppression, most of the the church's art and some of its altars were lost. When it reopened works were donated by private citizens. These include some paintings by minor figures, and five statues of saints from the altar of the Scuola dei Barbieri in Santa Maria dei Servi. The two saints on the inner façade (Cosmas & Damian) and the pair on the altar (Luke and Andrew) are by the Rizzo workshop, and the Madonna on the altar in the left aisle may be by André Beauneveu or Bartolomeo Bon. The painting in here is the Baptism of Christ by Daniele Heinz over the high altar.

Lost art
A Veronese Last Supper painted for this church is now in the Brera, Milan.

Campanile 19m (62ft) manual bells

13th Century and chunky, but it was once taller and more elegant, it seems (see right).

Opening times
9.30-12.00

Vaporetto
Ca d'Oro

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Jacopo de'Barbari's map of 1500 shows the church
before rebuilding, but it's still hemmed in.

 





















 



 

Santi Apostoli
Alessandro Vittoria 1570-75





 

History
This is supposedly one of the churches founded by St Magnus, the Bishop of Oderzo, in 643, and built on a site where he saw twelve cranes, after an apparition of the twelve Apostles told him to look for this sign. The church was rebuilt around 1020, with the first documented mention in 1094. Destroyed by a fire in 1105 and rebuilt. It was rebuilt again from 1570-75, probably by Alessandro Vittoria, and again in the mid-18th century by Giovanni Pedolo.

The church
A plain façade with the more attractive side view dominated by the campanile and the domed exterior of the Corner Chapel (see left).

Interior

A big dark box. Which all goes to throw into relief the lovely Corner chapel, the work of Giovanni Battista Castello. A bright and stony sanctuary, it's all that's left of the 16th Century church and was built (probably to a design by Codussi) for poor old Caterina Cornaro, Queen of Cyprus who was buried here in 1510. The chapel also has the tombs of her brother and father, Marco; the latter attributed to Tullio Lombardo.  Her body was moved to a big, flat and plain tomb in San Salvador around 1580. If I was her I'd have stayed here. The chapel also has a luminous altarpiece by Giambattista Tiepolo of The Martyrdom of Saint Lucy, whose just-removed eyes stare at you from a plate, and yes they do follow you around the chapel. The church has a sweet very old (late 13th Century) Veneto-Byzantine fresco fragment in the chapel to the right of the high altar, and on the left wall there's a spooky little dark nun's balcony, or something like that.

Campanile 47m (153 ft) electromechanical bells
The 7th Century campanile was destroyed by the fire of 1105. Rebuilt 1450, renovated 1601-09 by Francesco di Piero, brought down by a storm in 1659 and rebuilt 1672-1720 to a design by Andrea Tirali. Jan Morris says that an 'old and simple' sacristan fell from the campanile soon after its completion in 1672(?) but was caught by the minute hand on the clock, and so was slowly lowered to a parapet as time passed.

Lost art
An altarpiece by Benedetto Diana, commissioned by Giorgio Corner for the Corner chapel, has since disappeared.

The church in art
Canaletto's View of Campo Santi Apostoli (see below)

Ruskin said
The exterior is nothing.

Opening times
Monday to Saturday: 7.30 to 11.30 & 5.00 to 7.00


Vaporetto
Ca d'Oro

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Scalzi
Baldessare Longhena/Giuseppe Pozzo 1660-1680
 


History
The Barefoot Carmelites, or Scalzi, a stricter offshoot of the Carmelites, came to Venice in 1633 and in 1646 got Baldassare Longhena (the architect of the Salute church at the other end of the Grand Canal) to design them a monastery and a church, dedicated to Santa Maria di Nazareth. The church was built 1660-80, with finance provided by Girolamo Cavazza, and consecrated in 1705. Longhena directed until 1673 when responsibility passed to the lay Carmelite Giuseppe Pozzo. The monastery was suppressed in 1810, but the order returned in 1840. The monastery buildings were demolished when the railway station was built.

The church
The façade was built 1672-80, by Giuseppe Sardi. It was also paid for by Conte Cavazza, who stumped up the necessary 74,000 Ducats. The semi-clothed saints are attributed to Bernardo Falcone. It lays claim to being one of the better baroque façades in Venice - well ordered and not too congested.

Interior

An unrelaxing baroque riot in polychrome marble, with walls that might make you think of salami, statues aplenty, and a painting on every surface. It has no aisles, but a sequence of three connected deep side chapels on each side, the middle ones being much taller. Some welcome bright contrast is provided here by a couple of the chapels (the second on either side) having Tiepolo ceiling vaults
- the early St Teresa in Glory on the right and The Agony in the Garden on the left. The baldachin over the high altar is huge with serpentine
barley-sugar columns and statues of sibyls lounging about on the architecture - it's the work of the aforementioned Pozzo. Lodovico Manin, Venice's last doge, deposed by Napoleon in 1797, is buried here.

Campanile 37m (120ft) electromechanical bells
Made to plans by Longhena, it has a small onion dome on an eight-sided drum.

Ruskin said
It possesses a fine John Bellini, and is renowned through Venice for its precious marbles. I omitted to notice before, in speaking of the buildings of the Grotesque Renaissance, that many of them are remarkable for a kind of dishonesty, even in the use of true marbles, resulting not from motives of economy, but from mere love of juggling and falsehood for their own sake. I hardly know which condition of mind is meanest, that which has pride in plaster made to look like marble, or that which takes delight in marble made to look like silk. Several of the later churches in Venice, more especially those of the Jesuiti of San Clemente, and this of the Scalzi, rest their chief claims to admiration on their having curtains and cushions cut out of rock. The most ridiculous example is in San Clemente, and the most curious and costly are in the Scalzi; which latter church is a perfect type of the vulgar abuse of marble in every possible way, by men who had no eye for colour, and no understanding of any merit in a work of art but that which arises from costliness of material, and such powers of imitation as are devoted in England to the manufacture of peaches and eggs out of Derbyshire spar.

Lost art
Giambattista Tiepolo's ceiling fresco of the Transfer of the Holy House of Nazareth was destroyed by an Austrian bomb, aimed at the nearby railway station, on the 17th October 1915 (see before and after photos below). Seven fragments are now in the Accademia, as is a preparatory sketch for the lost central panel.

The 'John Bellini' mentioned by Ruskin above is no longer to be found here, but seems to have been a Madonna and Child which was also admired by George Eliot in her Journals. It was still here, and described as 'the gem of the church', in the late 19th Century.

Opening times
Monday to Saturday: 7.45 to 12.30,
4.00 to 7.00
Sundays: 7.00 to 11.45, 4.00 to 6.45

Scaffolding update The façade was totally covered in scaffolding in September 2013, and still was in March 2014.

Vaporetto Ferrovia

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Scuola dell'Angelo Custode
Andrea Tirali 1713
 







 
 
History
Begun in 1713 by Andrea Tirali, who is also responsible for the tambour on the top of the campanile of the Santi Apostoli church opposite, this church was built for the confraternity of the Angelo Custode. When the confraternities were suppressed in 1812 the scuola was bought by a German merchant called Sebastian Heinzelmann. German Protestants (moved from the Fondaco de Tedeschi, where they'd been since 1657) began using this building for worship, bringing with them two paintings. One of these was the Madonna in Glory with the Archangel Michael by Sebastiano Ricci. The angel over the entrance is by Flemish sculptor Heinrich Meyring more (in)famous for his work on San Moisè.  This building is now an Evangelical Lutheran church.
 
Interior
After passing through the more interesting and characterful entrance hall (see below) the church upstairs turns out to be a pale-painted plain and squareish space with wood fittings and a few fine paintings (see below left). Foremost of these is the altarpiece by Sebastiano Ricci The Madonna in Glory with the Archangel Michael, in which Michael is rescuing a child from the clutches of a sea monster. It contrasts with the portrait of Luther to its right, by the studio of Lucas Cranach (father or son, they're not sure). There's also a Titian painting of Christ on the left wall, given to the church when it was in the Fondaco de Tedeschi.


Opening times
Tuesday: 10.30 to 1.00

Vaporetto
Ca d'Oro



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